com.vividsolutions.jump.workbench.ui
Class VTextIcon

java.lang.Object
  extended by com.vividsolutions.jump.workbench.ui.VTextIcon
All Implemented Interfaces:
java.beans.PropertyChangeListener, java.util.EventListener, javax.swing.Icon

public class VTextIcon
extends java.lang.Object
implements javax.swing.Icon, java.beans.PropertyChangeListener

VTextIcon is an Icon implementation which draws a short string vertically. It's useful for JTabbedPanes with LEFT or RIGHT tabs but can be used in any component which supports Icons, such as JLabel or JButton

You can provide a hint to indicate whether to rotate the string to the left or right, or not at all, and it checks to make sure that the rotation is legal for the given string (for example, Chinese/Japanese/Korean scripts have special rules when drawn vertically and should never be rotated) Rucker, Lee Ann. "Vertical Text in Java." March 2002. Available from http://www.macdevcenter.com/pub/a/mac/2002/03/22/vertical_text.html. Internet; accessed 29 October 2002. Licence: "Anybody can use the code for any purpose; I don't want any compensation, nor do I accept any liability."


Field Summary
static int ROTATE_DEFAULT
           
static int ROTATE_LEFT
           
static int ROTATE_NONE
           
static int ROTATE_RIGHT
           
 
Constructor Summary
VTextIcon(java.awt.Component component, java.lang.String label)
          Creates a VTextIcon for the specified component with the specified label.
VTextIcon(java.awt.Component component, java.lang.String label, int rotateHint)
          Creates a VTextIcon for the specified component with the specified label.
 
Method Summary
 int getIconHeight()
          Returns the icon's height.
 int getIconWidth()
          Returns the icon's width.
 void paintIcon(java.awt.Component c, java.awt.Graphics g, int x, int y)
          Draw the icon at the specified location.
 void propertyChange(java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent e)
          Checks for changes to the font on the fComponent so that it can invalidate the layout if the size changes
 void setLabel(java.lang.String label)
          sets the label to the given string, updating the orientation as needed and invalidating the layout if the size changes
static int verifyRotation(java.lang.String label, int rotateHint)
          verifyRotation returns the best rotation for the string (ROTATE_NONE, ROTATE_LEFT, ROTATE_RIGHT) This is public static so you can use it to test a string without creating a VTextIcon from http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr9/tr9-3.html When setting text using the Arabic script in vertical lines, it is more common to employ a horizontal baseline that is rotated by 90 degrees counterclockwise so that the characters are ordered from top to bottom.
 
Methods inherited from class java.lang.Object
equals, getClass, hashCode, notify, notifyAll, toString, wait, wait, wait
 

Field Detail

ROTATE_DEFAULT

public static final int ROTATE_DEFAULT
See Also:
Constant Field Values

ROTATE_NONE

public static final int ROTATE_NONE
See Also:
Constant Field Values

ROTATE_LEFT

public static final int ROTATE_LEFT
See Also:
Constant Field Values

ROTATE_RIGHT

public static final int ROTATE_RIGHT
See Also:
Constant Field Values
Constructor Detail

VTextIcon

public VTextIcon(java.awt.Component component,
                 java.lang.String label)
Creates a VTextIcon for the specified component with the specified label. It sets the orientation to the default for the string

See Also:
verifyRotation(java.lang.String, int)

VTextIcon

public VTextIcon(java.awt.Component component,
                 java.lang.String label,
                 int rotateHint)
Creates a VTextIcon for the specified component with the specified label. It sets the orientation to the provided value if it's legal for the string

See Also:
verifyRotation(java.lang.String, int)
Method Detail

setLabel

public void setLabel(java.lang.String label)
sets the label to the given string, updating the orientation as needed and invalidating the layout if the size changes

See Also:
verifyRotation(java.lang.String, int)

propertyChange

public void propertyChange(java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent e)
Checks for changes to the font on the fComponent so that it can invalidate the layout if the size changes

Specified by:
propertyChange in interface java.beans.PropertyChangeListener

paintIcon

public void paintIcon(java.awt.Component c,
                      java.awt.Graphics g,
                      int x,
                      int y)
Draw the icon at the specified location. Icon implementations may use the Component argument to get properties useful for painting, e.g. the foreground or background color.

Specified by:
paintIcon in interface javax.swing.Icon

getIconWidth

public int getIconWidth()
Returns the icon's width.

Specified by:
getIconWidth in interface javax.swing.Icon
Returns:
an int specifying the fixed width of the icon.

getIconHeight

public int getIconHeight()
Returns the icon's height.

Specified by:
getIconHeight in interface javax.swing.Icon
Returns:
an int specifying the fixed height of the icon.

verifyRotation

public static int verifyRotation(java.lang.String label,
                                 int rotateHint)
verifyRotation returns the best rotation for the string (ROTATE_NONE, ROTATE_LEFT, ROTATE_RIGHT) This is public static so you can use it to test a string without creating a VTextIcon from http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr9/tr9-3.html When setting text using the Arabic script in vertical lines, it is more common to employ a horizontal baseline that is rotated by 90 degrees counterclockwise so that the characters are ordered from top to bottom. Latin text and numbers may be rotated 90 degrees clockwise so that the characters are also ordered from top to bottom. Rotation rules - Roman can rotate left, right, or none - default right (counterclockwise) - CJK can't rotate - Arabic must rotate - default left (clockwise) from the online edition of _The Unicode Standard, Version 3.0_, file ch10.pdf page 4 Ideographs are found in three blocks of the Unicode Standard... U+4E00-U+9FFF, U+3400-U+4DFF, U+F900-U+FAFF Hiragana is U+3040-U+309F, katakana is U+30A0-U+30FF from http://www.unicode.org/unicode/faq/writingdirections.html East Asian scripts are frequently written in vertical lines which run from top-to-bottom and are arrange columns either from left-to-right (Mongolian) or right-to-left (other scripts). Most characters use the same shape and orientation when displayed horizontally or vertically, but many punctuation characters will change their shape when displayed vertically. Letters and words from other scripts are generally rotated through ninety degree angles so that they, too, will read from top to bottom. That is, letters from left-to-right scripts will be rotated clockwise and letters from right-to-left scripts counterclockwise, both through ninety degree angles. Unlike the bidirectional case, the choice of vertical layout is usually treated as a formatting style; therefore, the Unicode Standard does not define default rendering behavior for vertical text nor provide directionality controls designed to override such behavior